An analysis of nicomachean ethics by

But at the same time his view is not too distant from a common idea. Aristotle's methodology in ethics therefore pays more attention than does Plato's to the connections that normally obtain between virtue and other goods.

This is because doing good things will make good people happy and rational thought is the highest good.

Nicomachean Ethics - Book I Summary & Analysis

It is not easy to understand the point Aristotle is making here. But Aristotle is not looking for a defense of this sort, because he conceives of friendship as lying primarily in activity rather than receptivity. That virtues of character can be described as means[ edit ] Aristotle says that whereas virtue of thinking needs teaching, experience and time, virtue of character moral virtue comes about as a consequence of following the right habits.

Determining what is kalon is difficult b28—33, a24—30and the normal human aversion to embracing difficulties helps account for the scarcity of virtue b10— While it is realm of ethics not usually explored in modern times, our ancient greek philosopher took it very seriously.

In both the akratic and the enkratic, it competes with reason for control over action; even when reason wins, it faces the difficult task of having to struggle with an internal rival. For to the latter flight is disgraceful and death is preferable to safety on those terms; while the former from the very beginning faced the danger on the assumption that they were stronger, and when they know the facts they fly, fearing death more than disgrace; but the brave man is not that sort of person.

Aristotle's Ethics: Summary

Choice is also not wishing for things one does not believe can be achieved, such as immortality, but rather always concerning realistic aims. Nor is it easy to see how his discussion of these five intellectual virtues can bring greater precision to the doctrine of the mean.

A Some agents, having reached a decision about what to do on a particular occasion, experience some counter-pressure brought on by an appetite for pleasure, or anger, or some other emotion; and this countervailing influence is not completely under the control of reason.

Nicomachean Ethics Summary

Plato holds that either the spirited part which houses anger, as well as other emotions or the appetitive part which houses the desire for physical pleasures can disrupt the dictates of reason and result in action contrary to reason. The argument is unconvincing because it does not explain why the perception of virtuous activity in fellow citizens would not be an adequate substitute for the perception of virtue in one's friends.

First, when a sick person experiences some degree of pleasure as he is being restored to health, the pleasure he is feeling is caused by the fact that he is no longer completely ill. Although we must be fortunate enough to have parents and fellow citizens who help us become virtuous, we ourselves share much of the responsibility for acquiring and exercising the virtues.

His intention in Book I of the Ethics is to indicate in a general way why the virtues are important; why particular virtues—courage, justice, and the like—are components of happiness is something we should be able to better understand only at a later point.

And one may see even other people, when they are hungry, delighting in the smell of food; but to delight in this kind of thing is the mark of the self-indulgent man; for these are objects of appetite to him.

This point is developed more fully in Ethics X. That happiness is stable means that it is not connected to transient feelings and that it is probably impossible to determine whether someone has achieved happiness while he or she is living.

But to die to escape from poverty or love or anything painful is not the mark of a brave man, but rather of a coward; for it is softness to fly from what is troublesome, and such a man endures death not because it is noble but to fly from evil.

According to Aristotle the potential for this virtue is by nature in humans, but whether virtues come to be present or not is not determined by human nature. The Nicomachean Ethics is very often abbreviated "NE", or "EN", and books and chapters are generally referred to by Roman and Arabic numerals, respectively, along with corresponding Bekker numbers.

But unless we can determine which good or goods happiness consists in, it is of little use to acknowledge that it is the highest end. I am tempted to help myself to two segments and do so, thus succumbing to temptation and even conceivably but why necessarily.

Aristotle's Ethics

At the same time, Aristotle makes it clear that in order to be happy one must possess others goods as well—such goods as friends, wealth, and power.

To say that there is something better even than ethical activity, and that ethical activity promotes this higher goal, is entirely compatible with everything else that we find in the Ethics.

What sort of acts, then, should be called compulsory. Chapters 6—12, First examples of moral virtues[ edit ] Aristotle now deals separately with some of the specific character virtues, in a form similar to the listing at the end of Book II, starting with courage and temperance.

Just as a big mouse can be a small animal, two big chapters can make a small book. By contrast, in Book VII Aristotle strongly implies that the pleasure of contemplation is the good, because in one way or another all living beings aim at this sort of pleasure.

Aristotle's Ethics

Book VI discusses five intellectual virtues, not just practical wisdom, but it is clear that at least one of these—craft knowledge—is considered only in order to provide a contrast with the others. He lies between the coward, who flees every danger and experiences excessive fear, and the rash person, who judges every danger worth facing and experiences little or no fear.

The answer to this question may be that Aristotle does not intend Book VI to provide a full answer to that question, but rather to serve as a prolegomenon to an answer.

Analysis The Nicomachean Ethics advances an understanding of ethics known as virtue ethics because of its heavy reliance on the concept of virtue. The word we translate as virtue is aretê, and it could equally be translated as “excellence.”. The Nicomachean Ethics is widely considered one of the most important historical philosophical works, Lecture on Aristotle's Nicomachaean Ethics A very complete analysis of Nicomachean Ethics.

Nicomachean Ethics Sparknote A study guide for Nicomachean Ethics. Nicomachean Ethics is a philosophical inquiry into the nature of the good life for a human being. Aristotle begins the work by positing that there exists some ultimate good toward which, in the final analysis, all human actions ultimately aim.

The necessary characteristics of the ultimate good are. The Nicomachean Ethics Analysis Literary Devices in The Nicomachean Ethics. Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory. Setting. Written around BCE, the philosophies in Aristotle's Ethics weren't just for the ancient Greeks. Analyzing setting for Ethics might be a weightless conversation, given he's.

Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics Summary and Analysis of Book One. Buy Study Guide. Section 1: Every human action aims at some good, and the good which is chosen for its own sake rather than as means to an end is the highest good. Ethics is a part of politics, which is the most authoritative and architectonic science.

An inquiry into ethics should.

Nicomachean Ethics - Book I Summary & Analysis

Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics study guide contains a biography of Aristotle, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

An analysis of nicomachean ethics by
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Nicomachean Ethics - Book I Summary & Analysis